alternative medicine for cardiovascular disease

a systematic search of the existing literature found that the prevalence of cam use ranges between 5% and 74.8% [3]. one study used the 2002 nhis to analyze data on cam use among patients with cvd and found that 36% of patients with cvd had used cam (excluding prayer) in the previous 12 months [5]. it is equally important for the advancement of the legitimate and rigorous study of cam to report negative as well as positive results, and it illustrates the need for studies of higher quality in this area. the results of a cochrane review suggest that there is a significant benefit in symptom control and physiologic outcomes from hawthorn extract as a treatment adjunct for chronic heart failure [17]. in 1998, the fda ruled that a red yeast rice product that contained a substantial amount of monacolin k was no longer a dietary supplement but an unapproved new drug and that marketing the product as a dietary supplement would be illegal [1].




the results of a systematic review indicate that supplement use is common in cardiac patients (26%–42%) and that the concomitant use of dietary supplements and prescription medication also appears to be frequent (16%–64%) [36]. in contrast to the complex and controversial body of research surrounding biologically-based therapies, there is a growing body of research suggesting that mbt are relatively safe and may have measurable benefits for cardiovascular health [5]. the review noted that in light of the poor methodological quality of the included studies, it is difficult to draw any definitive conclusions regarding the efficacy of relaxation techniques for primary hypertension or for reducing morbidity (myocardial infarctions and stroke) and mortality [38]. given that tai chi practice is safe and has good rates of adherence, it may represent an important complement to standard medical care in the treatment of deconditioned patients with systolic heart failure [48]. most rigorous clinical trials and systematic analyses of the research on homeopathy have concluded that there is little evidence to support it as an effective treatment for any specific condition [1]. more rigorous research is needed to determine the physiologic mechanisms and long-term benefits of these therapies.

a systematic search of eight bibliographic databases was conducted for studies that investigated cam use in patients with cardiovascular diseases. in cardiac patients, the use of cam offers both risks and benefits. we used a modified version of the qat in the present review (table 2). the bulk of the studies looked at cam use in general. herbal medicine in sixteen studies reporting the prevalence of herbal medicine use by people with cvd, herbal medicines were used by between 2% [17] and 46% [20] of respondents (figure 2). the reason for non-disclosure to physicians about cam use was investigated in two studies. the use of cam specifically to treat cardiovascular disease was reported in six studies [9, 16, 18, 26, 28, 31]. the lack of specific and consistent definitions of cam in the reviewed studies contribute to the variability observed and has made generalisations difficult. the use of cam is common in patients with cardiovascular conditions.

future studies are required to determine the impacts of cam use in cvd patients, particularly its clinical and prognostic impact when used in conjunction with prescription medicines. 10.1016/s0002-9343(01)00999-8. yeh g, davis r, phillips r: use of complementary therapies in patients with cardiovascular disease. ai a, bolling s: the use of complementary and alternative therapies among middle-aged and older cardiac patients. shafiq n, gupta m, kumari s, pandhi p: prevalence and pattern of use of complementary and alternative medicine (cam) in hypertensive patients of a tertiary care center in india. 2003, 36: 899-904. zick s, blume a, aaronson k: the prevalence and pattern of complementary and alternative supplement use in individuals with chronic heart failure. albert n, rathman l, ross d, walker d, bena j, mcintyre s, philip d, siedlecki s, lovelace r, fogarty a, et al: predictors of over-the-counter drug and herbal therapies use in elderly patients with heart failure. leung y, tamim h, stewart d, arthur h, grace s: the prevalence and correlates of mind-body therapy practices in patients with acute coronary syndrome. saha s, chant d, mcgrath j: meta-analyses of the incidence and prevalence of schizophrenia: conceptual and methodological issues. harris p, rees r: the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use among the general population: a systematic review of the literature. the use of complementary and alternative medicine by people with cardiovascular disease: a systematic review.

herbal products (echinacea, garlic, ginseng, ginkgo biloba, and glucosamine) and mind-body therapies (deep-breathing exercises and meditation) dietary supplements (fish oil, coenzyme q10, garlic, etc.) are among the most commonly used treatment modalities in patients with cvd. fish oil complementary and alternative medicine (cam) may offer benefits as well as risks to people with cardiovascular disease., related conditions, related conditions, role of complementary and alternative medicine in cardiovascular diseases, cure heart disease in 90 days, cardiovascular disease functional medicine.

for heart-related symptoms, the top 4 cam treatments used were relaxation programs (4.5%), stress management (4.4%), meditation (3.1%), and a number of herbs contain potent cardioactive glycosides, which have positive inotropic actions on the heart. the drugs digitoxin, derived from either d due to a higher adherence to conventional medicine and recommended checkups, complementary medicine utilization can have a positive effect on, lifestyle changes for coronary heart disease, complementary therapies for coronary heart disease nhs, homeopathy, cardiomyopathy natural treatment, cardiac cough home remedies, how to treat heart failure without medication, types of complementary therapies, does alternative medicine work, complementary medicine meaning. cam therapieswhole medical systems – homeopathy, ayurvedic medicine.mind-body interventions – yoga, tai chi, meditation, qigong, biofeedback, hypnotherapy, spirituality.biologically based therapies – vitamin, mineral and herbal treatments.manipulative and body-based methods – massage or chiropractic therapy.

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