tulsi medicine

the use of tulsi in daily rituals is a testament to ayurvedic wisdom and provides an example of ancient knowledge offering solutions to modern problems. daily consumption of tulsi is said to prevent disease, promote general health, wellbeing and longevity and assist in dealing with the stresses of daily life. [28] in addition to protecting against toxic chemicals, tulsi has also been shown to protect against the toxic effects of heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, cadmium, chromium and mercury[29,30,31] and the toxic effects of radiation. while the exact causes of metabolic syndrome are still being debated, there is evidence to suggest that tulsi can assist in dealing with many features of metabolic syndrome and their consequences.




the psychotherapeutic properties of tulsi have been explored in various animal experiments that reveal that tulsi has anti-anxiety and anti-depressant properties,[116,117,118] with effects comparable to diazepam and antidepressants drugs. [125] while modern scientific studies suggest that tulsi is effective in treating a range of stressful conditions, within ayurveda, tulsi is more commonly recommended as a preventive measure to enhance the ability to adapt to both psychological and physical stress and therefore prevent the development of stress-related diseases. tulsi has also been used in cities to combat air pollution and hundreds of thousands of tulsi plants have been planted around the taj mahal in agra to help protect the iconic marble building from environmental pollution damage. modern day scientific research into tulsi demonstrates the many psychological and physiological benefits from consuming tulsi and provides a testament to the wisdom inherent in hinduism and ayurveda, which celebrates tulsi as a plant that can be worshipped, ingested, made into tea and used for medicinal and spiritual purposes within daily life.

in the ayurveda system tulsi is often referred to as an “elixir of life” for its healing powers and has been known to treat many different common health conditions. to date, however, there are no systematic reviews on the clinical efficacy and safety of tulsi as a single herbal intervention in humans. the objective of this review was therefore to summarize and critically appraise human clinical trials of tulsi in order to assess the current evidence on tulsi’s clinical efficacy and safety. four studies reported on the use of tulsi alone and along with food, hypoglycemic drug, curry or neem [63, 67, 69, 76].

a further 12-week study of type 2 diabetes patients reported greater improvement in both blood glucose and hbac1 levels when 300 mg of tulsi leaf extract was administered along with the antidiabetic drug glibenclamide, compared to drug treatment alone [67]. this is in contrast to three clinical studies that reported significant reduction in anxiety and stress levels with higher doses of tulsi given over a longer time period [72, 82, 83]. the clinical effects demonstrated in the reviewed studies suggest tulsi may have an important role in addressing other inflammatory disorders and that the ayurvedic tradition of consuming tulsi on a daily basis may be an effective lifestyle measure to address many modern chronic diseases. despite the lack of large-scale or long term clinical trials on the effect of tulsi in humans, the findings from 24 human studies published to date suggest that the tulsi is a safe herbal intervention that may assist in normalising glucose, blood pressure and lipid profiles, and dealing with psychological and immunological stress.

[2] within ayurveda, tulsi is known as “the incomparable one,” “mother medicine of nature” and “the queen of herbs,” and is revered as an “elixir of life” tulsi, also known as holy basil, is indigenous to the indian continent and highly revered for its medicinal uses within the ayurvedic and siddha medical tulsi is a natural mouth freshener and an oral disinfectant. ocimum sanctum can also cure mouth ulcers. holy basil destroys the bacteria that are responsible, tulsi uses, tulsi uses, tulsi plant, how to consume tulsi leaves, holy basil.

tulsi leaves are used to treat skin problems like acne, blackheads and premature ageing. tulsi is used to treat insect bites. tulsi is also used to treat heart disease and fever. tulsi is also used to treat respiratory problems. holy basil (ocimum tenuiflorum) is a plant that is native to india. it is commonly used in the traditional indian medicine system, ayurveda. hindi as tulsi, might be the most revered medicinal herb on the planet. in western medicine, holy basil is valued as an adaptogen. tulsi is well known for its myriad medicinal properties — antibacterial, antifungal, antipyretic, antioxidant, antiseptic and anticancer., tulsi scientific name, tulsi leaves side effects, tulsi common name, ocimum sanctum, medicinal uses of tulsi wikipedia, research papers on tulsi pdf, tulsi tea benefits, benefits of tulsi plant at home, tulsi family, ocimum sanctum medicinal uses.

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